Amy Cocksedge

Amy Cocksedge

After completing an undergraduate degree at Wilfrid Laurier (Honors Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies and English), Amy realized her true passion was wildlife. She returned to school to gain credits in wildlife biology at McGill, eventually leading to her Masters of Environmental Studies at York University and a graduate diploma in International and Security Studies. Amy’s graduate research focused on wildlife conservation, looking at animal behavior, human-wildlife conflict, the wildlife trade, and political-ecology. Specifically, she studied the way that elephant behavior influenced human-elephant conflict, focusing primarily on male society and adolescence. Following graduation, Amy wanted to continue similar work and decided to do a second masters in biology. She is now working toward a Masters in Biology at York University with Dr. Greg Thiemann, looking at the use of remote radar to aid in mitigating human-polar bear conflict. Amy is an avid traveler and has done research in both Costa Rica and Namibia, working on projects such as human-influenced bat behavior, sea turtle nesting, hyena-human conflict, and camera trap projects to monitor mammal populations.